Contact Us

In a hurry? Email is the fastest way to reach our team

Posting a gig? sales@geekyreality.com

Advisor? Partner? Intern? discuss@geekyreality.com 

 

Call us +1 209 854 4488

Hours of operation: Monday to Fridays, 10am to 6pm EST.

USA: Geeky Reality Foundation, 37 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, United States

UK: c/o Ad Hoc Global LTD, 71-75 Shelton Street, Covent Garden, London, WC2H 9JQ


     Twitter: www.twitter.com/geekyreality
      Facebook: www.facebook.com/geekyreality
      LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/groups/8594386   

 

The Geeky Reality Foundation is a Benefit Corporation file no. 6735892. 

The registered office of the corporation in the State of Delaware is 16192 Coastal Highway, in the city of Lewes, County of Sussex, Delaware 19958. USA. The registered agent in charge thereof is Harvard Business Services, Inc. 

Read more about how we are funded.

 

 

Latest from the Geeky Girl Reality Blog

1. Say hi :) who are you what do you do? Hi/Bonjour/Hallo! I am Daisy Hessenberger, a comedian and communicator who put herself through 4 years of researching evolutionary genetics to then leave academia and work at an entirely different scale - ecosystems! My current career is split between the office and what I do outside the office. For the first, at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, I work on helping nature to help humans. For the latter, I draw/write/joke about science. 2. How did you arrive at this career? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? Looking back it is easy to weave a narrative of how I was always meant to work in conservation; as a child I loved the environment, a Wobbegong shark was my favorite animal for a while, and I devoured books by Gerald Durrell (see my PLOS blog on how those formed who I am today). But the truth is, while I knew I loved conservation, it was not always something I knew I wanted to do. When I was 21 I knew I wanted to study epigenetics (that which is inherited but not the DNA code); I knew this so passionately I embarked on a 4 year PhD on hybridisation in algae. At 25, I only knew that I was not convinced about academia; cue a 3 year stint in open access publishing during which I discovered scicomm through improv and art . At 27, I needed a break from office work so I quit my job, spent three months volunteering with a conservation NGO in the forests of Madagascar and realised this could be my next step. But it was when I started work at IUCN that I realized how much I loved this work; I realized that this is what I want to do for the next five years at least. As for my work outside of work, while the drawing and blogging came as no surprise, getting up on stage monthly to do improv comedy inspired by science was something I never saw coming. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? This question takes some thought as the honest answer is that I am not entirely sure. This job is challenging. Working outside of my expertise, there is so much I still need to learn and the workload is large to say the least. And yet everyday, between when I wake up and arrive at work, I smile because I love what I do (maybe not the moment I have to get out of bed but somewhere along my hour long commute and once I have imbibed caffeine). I smile because I love learning, because I believe in what I am doing, and because the team that I am working with is ace. We have a lot to do but we support one another - and have fun while doing so. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? Getting some perspective. This could be by looking at the mountains on the other side of Lake Geneva and reminding myself how small I am in this world. Or by doing a breathing exercise (inspired by the Head Space app) to connect with my body. Or by talking to my allies. I only discovered my personal cures through the counselling I undertook during my PhD. Even if not in a time of crisis, counselling worked for me by equipping me with the tools to combat stress. An unexpected form of support has been asking for feedback. During a time where I was questioning my leadership and teamwork skills, I took a test (courtesy of the Homeward Bound project, a leadership initiative for women in STEM - check it out ) in which I had to ask six people I worked with to answer questions about me. I am pretty data driven so to see the results affirming that I am viewed as a great leader...well sometimes re-assurance is powerful and data-driven re-assurance even more so. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I do not have any one role model, instead I have many representing the different interests I have in life. 6. What advice would you give to your 18 year old self? I would give her a lot. Although if I could only say one thing I would tell her that it works out ok. More specifically here are some things I would say: Do not be scared of improv - just do it Write something (anything) during your PhD and publish it Being an explorer is a thing Binge watching TV shows does not make you a terrible person Never quiet your own voice even if others are shushing you 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Be picky. STEM is for you - do it on your own terms. You are the precious resource and do not have to take the first PhD offered to you. Find allies, any allies. I found mine in the team room working on the same algae in the same building and we supported one another. Publish something, anything (preferably open access). You do not need to be a researcher to publish in academic journals nor do you need to have completed a beautiful original piece of research tied up with a bow. Opinion pieces or Mini Reviews are short articles that are not so expensive - pitch the idea to a colleague and write it together.  8. How do you measure your success? The truth is that I compare myself to other people. I look at my friends and peers who are postdocs or consultants, own houses or aim to retire by the age of 40. My aim is for me to measure my success by the impact of my actions, what I have contributed to the world and how content I feel on average.  9. Where can we find out more about your work? My lifes work: https://dhessenberger.wordpress.com/ My sciart work: https://pineapplesandwhales.wordpress.com/ My scicomedy work: http://catcave9.thecatalyst.ch/ My science work at IUCN: https://www.iucn.org/theme/ecosystem-management 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Twitter: @DaisyScience Instagram: @DaisyScience LinkedIn:  Daisy Hessenberger
1. Say hi :) who are you what do you do? My name is Tae'lur Alexis, I am a Front-End Engineer born and raised in San Diego, California but now currently based in Seattle, Washington. My role is in charge of making the user experience accessible and effortless. I've been a professional developer for close to 7 months now. Prior to the transition into tech, I was working a variety of retail and fast food jobs. 2. How did you arrive at this career? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I was never exposed to Computer Science or STEM in general as a child. I struggled with math so I'm sure no one ever saw this path as a legitimate option for me. It started when I found Khan Academy and was able to catch up on the math I struggled with in high school fairly quickly. That's when I realised that I learn best at my own pace and when it's driven out of desire, not necessity. I found my way to Codecademy, learned the basics of Python and web development and fell in love with building projects off of Udemy. The reason I chose front end development as my primary focus was because of the ability to combine technical aptitude with my sense of creativity to build a user experience with a purpose. I don't have a college degree so I was doubtful that making the change into tech would be successful but I started promoting my work on Twitter and building a following based off of my transparency about my self taught journey and willingness to help others. It eventually caught the attention of employers. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I love that in this industry, you will always be able to learn different technologies and manifest whatever you visualize in your mind with code. I remind myself of how far I've come and it makes me get out of bed. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I will be 100% honest with you, I still struggle with that at times. The fact of the matter is all of us deal with varying degrees of imposter syndrome, where we doubt our work. What I do is rest and reflect. My stress is usually rooted in a mixture of lack of sleep and lots of anxiety. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? My role model is Stephanie Hurlburt. She is the Co-Founder of a successful image compression company here in Seattle. What makes her my role model is that she is so genuine and pure with her intentions. She stands by what she says. She was there for me during the most difficult challenges I've ever faced in my career & actively supports young women in the industry. She also is transparent about the importance of mental health which is so critical, especially in an industry that can be high-stress. She has a wealth of knowledge regarding salary negotiation and knowing your worth to founding your own start-up (what what I am working on next year 😏), networking and overall finding the balance between your career and social life as well. She's become such a close friend and there's not a day that goes by that I don't look up to her. Especially since I am 3000 miles away from my own family, she's become like a sister to me. 6. What advice would you give to your 18 year old self? The advice I would give to my 18 year old self would be to live it honestly. I needed to go through the trials and tribulations I went through as a teenager in order to develop the character, depth, and hustler mentality that I have now. If everything went perfect and as planned, then I wouldn't be as driven to build and help others as I do now. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM?   Stay consistent - The key to bettering your craft is consistency. I highly recommend dedicating time and effort to what you want to do in order to get what you ultimately want. Learn to not care early on  - The work in STEM can reign and take precedence over every other aspect of your life. Try not to let that happen. Study hard and strive to accomplish every goal you set, but also try to have a healthy social life as well as time for yourself. Please keep this in mind as you ascend up the ladder and make moves. Do not attach your self-worth to your work. Maintain a work/life balance - The work in STEM can reign and take precedence over every other aspect of your life. Try not to let that happen. Study hard and strive to accomplish every goal you set, but also try to have a healthy social life as well as time for yourself. Please keep this in mind as you ascend up the ladder and make moves. Do not attach your self-worth to your work.  8. How do you measure your success? My success is measured by my ability to get what I want done and realising my value.  9. Where can we find out more about your work? I tweet about the work I do every day on Twitter. I am currently building a platform for self-taught developers to bookmark and share resources as well as find study partners. The goal of the site is to be a resource for self-taught developer and provide what I would have wanted when I was starting out! I'll release the MVP soon so interested users can sign up and stay updated on the progress. I'll also be producing content for Egghead in the beginning of next year and it will be related to interview prep and how to utilise social media to build an online brand as a developer and land the role that you want. So watch out for that in 2019 and stay updated on Twitter! 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Yes, I live on Twitter! But if Twitter isn't your thing, hit me up on LinkedIn or Facebook! I'm always available to connect with and help women and girls. Twitter: @TaelurAlexis LinkedIn: Tae'lur Alexis Facebook: Tae'lur Alexis
1. Say hi :) who are you what do you do? Hello! My name is Mariah, and I run FemSTEM.com! I am the Founder, and Editor-in-Chief! 2. How did you arrive at this career? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? Oh, boy. Freelance writing is really a tough field in general. But I find it’s been a challenge even running my own site.   I’ve been freelancing for years now, and started off working for others. Unfortunately, I never worked for anyone who paid me well.  After I got let go from what I thought was going to be my big break, I started FemSTEM on my own. Yes, I’ve always wanted to write for a living.  What I didn’t know  was that I would be interested in writing about STEM in particular.  That was a whole new idea for me. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? It helps that I can do this from home, haha!  But when I’m not on break (as I have been lately), what gets me excited is the STEM community surrounding the website now.  I have met so many wonderful Women In STEM through this, and they’re always so willing to help one another. It’s amazing. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I don’t think there’s ever a cure for stress, haha!  When I am over-stressed, I try to just walk away from my project and revisit it later.  Drink some tea, or watch some mind-numbing television or YouTube for a little while. Breaks are important! 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I’d say I have a lot of different people who I would consider role models.  From my parents, to lots of different authors, and scientists, I have a hard time narrowing it down.  I think you need to pull good qualities from many people, and learn from all of them that way.  Sticking to one person as your role model could maybe even be dangerous for you emotional health -- unfortunately, the saying “don’t meet your heroes” exists for a reason.  So my thoughts are, try to learn from everyone you meet, and use good traits as your models, rather than one specific person. 6. What advice would you give to your 18 year old self? Stick with math.  It can be so incredibly intimidating, but stick with it.  You’ll need it, and it’s really not as bad as you’re making it out to be right now. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? -- Learn from everyone .  Every single person you come across. -- LISTEN . So many people you will come across in this field have good advice to share, and you can and will learn so much if you open up to them and listen. -- Take everything one step at a time.  It is so easy to get completely caught up and do way too much at once, but you will burn out that way. Burn out can kill your joy, even for something you are extremely passionate about. Take it slow. 8. How do you measure your success? I don’t have a great answer for this, unfortunately. Honestly, I tend to not be so healthy about how I measure my own success.  But it is important to remember that everyone measures it differently, and to not let others bring you down. They may not see you as successful for one reason or another, but you cannot let the opinions of others dictate what you do and how you see yourself.  This can really kill your joy. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? Just check out FemSTEM.com!  Honestly, the more interesting things are the interviews I do.  Those women and their work are so much more interesting! 10.  Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? You can find me on: Twitter:  @officialfemstem Instagram:  @officialfemstem
View all blog posts