What is a STEM gig?

What is a STEM gig?

gig

informal, noun gig; plural noun: gigs

A job, especially one that is temporary

"working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig"

"I need an awesome summer gig to get some real work experience!"

STEM gig

  • Internships 
  • Summer jobs
  • Work experience
  • Mentor programs 
  • Scholarships
  • Networking events
  • Awards, contests, competitions
  • What else? Any opportunity that encourages a young woman in STEM before her professional career begins...

 

 


 

Are you "geeky" girl? Studying math, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, social sciences, biology, etc?

Geeky Girl Reality is here to kickstart your career. If you majored in physics, maths, social sciences, chemistry, computer science or similar STEM subjects, we aim to have all the resources you need to start building your career. 

Still studying?

Currently enrolled in university and still learning about possible paths and careers?

Take part in the student survey » 

Gigs are all about balancing work and study - getting some real-world exposure to your field of study. 

Not yet ready for a full-time STEM job? You need a STEM gig, girl! 

We highlight short-term opportunities like summer programs, internships and mentor programs.

Through our Geeky Girl Reality research we found that young women are looking for short term opportunities to help them start out in STEM careers.

Search our STEM gigs to find the gig to kickstart your career!

- The Geeky Girl Reality team


Interested in joining our team? Send your CV and letter of interest to discuss@geekyreality.com

 


 

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

Quotes from our survey participants

In our annual Geeky Girl Reality survey we asked young women currently studying STEM about their in the field and where they might be in 10 years...

 

 

We hope to help them get there with our social mission to support "geeky" girls living their reality.

Take part in the student survey »

Take part in the professional survey »

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

 

Latest from the Geeky Girl Reality Blog

1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Sophia Lee. By day I am a Software Developer at Microsoft where I work with a team of developers to create one of the largest news sites in the world. By night I am a Transgender Social Activist who works to bring social justice to Transgender people. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I always loved programming, ever since I was little, and I had a talent for it. It was a difficult path for me to get to where I am though. As an Immigrant, Transgender Woman of Color I had to navigate unique challenges to learn how to leverage my backgrounds to become the person I am today. Now my software development skills have developed into a tool that I use to fight for social justice. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? As a software developer I can create tools that can change the world. Applications that are used by millions of people. Software that enable people to achieve more. I love taking my talents and lifting up other people. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I go up to the rooftop of my apartment complex and I look out at the amazing world we get to live in. The lights of the city, the snowy mountain peaks, and the beautiful blue sea. It gives me peace. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I never had a specific role model growing up. So, I decided to become the role model that the younger me would have wanted to have. I want to show people that Immigrant, Transgender Women of Color could be smart, pretty, strong, well-spoken and successful. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? Come out of the closet earlier. You will still be loved. Be truthful to yourself. Follow your heart. Trust in your ability to survive. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Don't just concentrate on STEM. Take art, minority studies, learn an instrument, and pick up a sport. Become a well-rounded person.. STEM is hard, but it is worth it. You are here because you are just as smart and talented as everyone else. Don't lose faith in yourself. Don't change who you are for STEM. STEM needs people of all diversities and backgrounds. Embrace your differences. 8. How do you measure your success? I measure my success in my reach for social change. My STEM background is a building block to bring about social justice for all. I believe that technology can be the tool that equalizes the playing field for all people. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? https://genderjusticeleague.org https://transgirltheory.com 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Find me on twitter at @geekgirl1024 LinkedIn at https://linkedin.com/in/sophia-lee-b359406/
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Jenny Saucerman. I’m an instructional designer: someone who makes online education to teach adults skills for their workplaces. A big part of my job is making educational games and simulations which is pretty awesome! I also work with learning analytics and using statistics to help me understand whether the content I create is effective at teaching my learners. I graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a master’s degree in educational psychology with a focus on educational gaming. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? Instructional design is interesting because it’s a career path nobody really decides to pursue: it’s usually happenstance that you find yourself doing it. When I was in high school all the way through the end of grad school, I wanted to be a psychology professor. I got my bachelor’s degree in psychology and enrolled in a PhD program. After five years I decided that being a professor wasn’t for me. This was a hard decision to make as that goal had shaped my life for the past 10 years! I talked to a career counselor who recommended that I look into instructional design jobs. It was hard to get my foot in the door as I didn’t have the usual background experience with course development programs. But one company saw my potential and decided to take a chance with hiring me. I realized it was a great fit for me, and I’ve been working as an instructional designer since. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I work for a company that gives me a lot of creative freedom and resources to create awesome content. I love prototyping my crazy ideas and getting positive feedback. It can be easy to get lost in the nitty gritty details of my projects, so I try to think back on positive feedback from learners and fellow instructional designers when I’m having a hard time. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? Having a network of people, personal and professional, has been a lifesaver for me. If I’m stuck on a problem, it usually means that I’m missing a piece of information and I need to talk to someone about it. If I’m stressed out, talking to my husband, friends, and family usually helps. If you’re experiencing stress for a prolonged period of time, talking to a therapist or counselor is helpful too. If nobody is available to talk or I want to be alone, I go for a walk. I look at the trees and the birds and try to put my problems into perspective. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I think idolizing people strips them of their humanity, so I don’t think having a role model is very helpful to me. I’m a human with human problems, so I can’t learn too much from someone I think is a total rockstar who has their life all put together. Because nobody does! I have learned so much from my favorite professors and my friends by watching them be regular (but awesome!) people and talking to them about their successes and their struggles. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? The future you’re working so hard for? I’m living in it, and it’s wonderful. It doesn’t look the way you think it will, but everything you’re doing is worth it. Just go with the flow. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Failure is fundamental to the learning process. You’re going to mess up. You’re going to get the wrong answer. You’re going to plug the cord into the wrong spot. Your code isn’t going to work on the first try. Now that you know this, let yourself try new things and get the wrong answer and keep trying even if it doesn’t work immediately. Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good. Think creatively and then critically. Don’t shoot down your ideas right away. Take a moment to consider why that idea came to you: you might notice features that’ll inspire a better solution. Having hobbies outside your field is very important. I’ve always played with drawing and graphic design as a personal artistic outlet as I studied psychology, statistics, and programming, and I’m so glad I did! I use graphic design almost every day in my job now. Having outside interests will help you make connections between concepts that wouldn’t occur to people who only did STEM work all the time. 8. How do you measure your success? I consider a project successful when I want other people to play through it and tell me what they think of it. It means I did well enough to want to show it off and watch people as they experience what I’ve made. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? I post about my work on twitter mostly. If you Google my name, you can also read guest blog posts I’ve written or listen to a podcast I was on (https://www.sproutlabs.com.au/blog/assessment-in-elearning/) 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? @jennysaucerman is my twitter handle. You can also add me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennysaucerman/
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? I'm Julia, and I am a space roboticist who also loves art and science communication. I’m a NASA Space Technology Research Fellow and this summer I am at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where I work on making cool sensors for even cooler robots. My current project at NASA is with an origami-inspired robot called PUFFER. Outside of that, you can find me at Stanford University, where I'm a PhD student studying robotics. I graduated in 2018 with a B.S. at Columbia University in Electrical Engineering, where I was dedicated to student activities such as the Columbia Space Initiative, Women in Computer Science, and the student Makerspace. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? Oh no, definitely not! I was going to go to an art college for undergraduate studies. I've always thought space and robots were cool, but I never considered actually doing it for a career until I went to college and started the Columbia Space Initiative, now an award-winning engineering student group. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I love my job because I get to try out cool and crazy ideas. Some of those ideas are bad, some of them are good - and some of them will eventually make it to outer space, your school textbooks, or art museums. What could be cooler than being able to help invent the future? For the aspiring space roboticists in the crowd, NASA JPL is a great place to be! In addition to PUFFER, there’s plenty of other cutting-edge robots that even interns can work on. For instance, JPL has a team participating in the latest DARPA subterranean challenge called CoSTAR and I have several friends working on this for their internship! 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? Everyone experiences stress or self-doubt at least once in their lives. For me, it helps to remember all that my family has overcome to even get to this point. My grandparents are peasant farmers from China, with an elementary school level of education, having dropped out of school to work. My parents immigrated and learned the way of new country, America, where they didn't speak the language and didn't have any money. I am the first in my entire family to be born outside of China. When I am stressed, I remember that I never face my problems alone, and that no problems are truly insurmountable. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I have had so many role models and mentors to look up to, both in my field and in my personal life, that it's hard to pick just one. Though not all of them may look like me, they all share positive qualities that I hope to integrate in my own life. But my answer would have to be my mother - Chinese culture is traditionally patriarchal, and she broke the mold by raising me to value my independence and self-sufficiency. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? I would tell myself, and still tell myself today, to not worry about the future and career paths. It's okay to be unsure of what you want to do, or who you want to be. Keep good company (friends and family) and work hard to support yourself and pursue your goals. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? First, focus and learn. No matter how many roadblocks you hit, or how many naysayers you face - if you cultivate your talent in science/engineering/math/technology, you will find a place in the STEM fields. Focus on improving your skills, and don't waste energy on negative influences and naysayers. Second, speak up. If you come up with an idea, just say it! Don't be afraid of if it's "right" or "wrong" or if a boy is going to say the same idea 10 seconds later. Ask a lot of questions and don't be afraid if some of them seem stupid Often, the "stupid" questions I ask end up being very important because they point out something, some design issue, that everyone else overlooked! You are smart and capable, but you have to show it by advocating for yourself. Third, use your uniqueness to your advantage. Because of the gender inequity in STEM fields, being a woman or gender minority is an automatic way of standing out in a crowd. Use that to your advantage when meeting people, networking, and learning about new things. 8. How do you measure your success? By how happy I am to share it with my family and friends. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? For organizations and fellowships that I am part of, you can check out the following links: PUFFER: https://spectrum.ieee.org/video/aerospace/robotic-exploration/puffer-nasa-origami-inspired-robot NASA Research Fellowship: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/strg/nstrf_2018/ Brooke Owens Fellowship: http://www.brookeowensfellowship.org/julia-di Columbia Space Initiative: http://columbiaspace.org 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? For my social media, you can find me on Twitter: @astroboticist Instagram: @astroboticist LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/JuliaDi
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