What is a STEM gig?

What is a STEM gig?

gig

informal, noun gig; plural noun: gigs

A job, especially one that is temporary

"working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig"

"I need an awesome summer gig to get some real work experience!"

STEM gig

  • Internships 
  • Summer jobs
  • Work experience
  • Mentor programs 
  • Scholarships
  • Networking events
  • Awards, contests, competitions
  • What else? Any opportunity that encourages a young woman in STEM before her professional career begins...

 

 


 

Are you "geeky" girl? Studying math, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, social sciences, biology, etc?

Geeky Girl Reality is here to kickstart your career. If you majored in physics, maths, social sciences, chemistry, computer science or similar STEM subjects, we aim to have all the resources you need to start building your career. 

Still studying?

Currently enrolled in university and still learning about possible paths and careers?

Take part in the student survey » 

Gigs are all about balancing work and study - getting some real-world exposure to your field of study. 

Not yet ready for a full-time STEM job? You need a STEM gig, girl! 

We highlight short-term opportunities like summer programs, internships and mentor programs.

Through our Geeky Girl Reality research we found that young women are looking for short term opportunities to help them start out in STEM careers.

Search our STEM gigs to find the gig to kickstart your career!

- The Geeky Girl Reality team


Interested in joining our team? Send your CV and letter of interest to discuss@geekyreality.com

 


 

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

Quotes from our survey participants

In our annual Geeky Girl Reality survey we asked young women currently studying STEM about their in the field and where they might be in 10 years...

 

 

We hope to help them get there with our social mission to support "geeky" girls living their reality.

Take part in the student survey »

Take part in the professional survey »

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

 

Latest from the Geeky Girl Reality Blog

1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? Hi! My name is Adana Llanos Wilson, although professionally I go by Adana Llanos. I am a molecular and cancer epidemiologist and Assistant Professor at Rutgers School of Public Health. My research focuses on cancers that disproportionately affect minorities and medically underserved populations. The objective of my research program is to understand the molecular and sociobiological mechanisms that cause poorer cancer outcomes among these groups. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I was always good in math and science and figured that I would ultimately pursue a medical degree to become the first doctor in my family. While I eventually did become the first doctor in my family, I realized along the way that medical school was not the right path for me. As an undergraduate student at Howard University, I majored in biology (and minored in chemistry). After graduating, I applied to medical school unsuccessfully and thought I would take a gap year to study for the MCAT and reapply. During the summer after my graduation, I was offered a fellowship to pursue a PhD and couldn’t pass up the offer. So I applied to the doctoral program in genetics and human genetics, which the fellowship covered, allowing me to pursue my doctoral studies. This led me to my interests in cancer research. During my doctoral program, my advisor, the late Dr. Verle Headings, suggested I reach out to Dr. Peter Shields at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown. Upon meeting him and discussing my research interests, Dr. Shields invited me to join his lab for my dissertation research. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? Knowing that my research might help someone, especially someone that looks like me, is what gets me out of bed every morning. I also really enjoy mentoring and advising students interested in pursuing careers in STEM and/or in biomedical fields. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? My personal cure for stress is meditation, massages, traveling, and talking to my therapist. I think mental health is wealth! I can’t think of one particular story, but there are times when I experience “impostor syndrome” but I keep reminding myself that God has given me a particular set of gifts that require me to work hard and use those gifts to make a difference. I believe that I am able to do that through my research and by mentoring aspiring scientists and public health professionals. I would also add that it is important to always believe in yourself. “No one is you and that is your superpower!” 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I have many role models, including my mother and grandmothers, who inspire me to keep working hard even in difficult times. Professionally, my role model is Dr. Lucile Adams-Campbell, who is a world renowned epidemiologist and has been my mentor for over 10 years. Dr. Adams-Campbell was one of my mentors during my postdoctoral fellowship years and is someone whose career I admire. And she truly gives excellent advice. It’s also worth noting, Dr. Adams-Campbell was the first mentor I ever had that is a Black woman. And she is one of a kind! 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? The one thing I would say to a younger me is that you are stronger than you know and your work will speak for itself. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Never doubt yourself, your intelligence and talents, or your place in STEM. Find yourself a good mentor that can relate to you on both professional AND personal levels. Keeping working hard and your work will speak for itself. 8. How do you measure your success? My main measure of success is in my ability to set goals and achieve them. Once a goal has been achieved, I work on achieving the next one. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? Here is a link to my current faculty profile: https://sph.rutgers.edu/concentrations/biostatistics-epidemiology/faculty-member.php?id=61231 You can also find me on Twitter, where I try to post updates about my research: @AdanaLlanos 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Twitter: @AdanaLlanos LinkedIn: Adana Llanos, PhD, MPH
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? Jillian Wise, PhD. I am a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Medical School-The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. I am working on researching the genomics of cancer as it relates to resistance to therapies and immunology. Also, I am a Founding Member of TIME’S UP Healthcare. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? My original goal was to be a medical oncologist. However, during my university years, I realized that much of curative research happens in laboratories. After doing a summer internship in a cancer research laboratory, I was hooked! I thrived on intellectual freedom, exploration and the impact on patients. During my first postdoc, I realized that massive data accumulation started to be necessary in research. I had no computer analytics skills. So, I decided to do a second postdoctoral research fellow in computational analytics/bioinformatics. I would never have foreseen myself coding. However, I am in awe and floored by the exploration which is achievable in genomics given the resources gained from the human genome atlas and computer science. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? Curiosity. When that fails, I remember the many times someone has thanked me and described how cancer has affected their lives. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I find exercise is my best stress management. It requires time not thinking about said stressor and the endorphin release is good for my mood. I am also a fan of traveling; it offers multiple perspectives; including how big the world is and that many people are out there trying to succeed at similar goals. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I think I have many role models for different aspects of my life: my career, motherhood, life-style, etc. There is not one person who has all the same challenges as myself and even the best of role models has faced challenges beyond my own. In science, I have many including: Sara Seager, Felipe Samaniego, Ralph Steinman and Resa Lewiss. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? I do wish, when I was younger, I had learned to take my love of science beyond the enjoyment of the basic school program. There are so many opportunities to make science a hobby or join programs to study it outside of school hours, which I was unaware of. I think I would have had a better perspective of the multiple ways science is integrated and utilized outside the classroom. I believe this would have led to more successful academic applications. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Don’t be put off by failure, only of how you deal with it. Try to integrate your favorite subjects into your life outside of school. Go look up all the cool careers involving coding, science, biology, and all of your interests. Try and shadow people...there is so much out there beyond the stereotypical choices! 8. How do you measure your success? My own happiness 9. Where can we find out more about your work? I have a few articles on pubmed, there is also some publically available lectures. 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Twitter: Jillianmcwise Linkedin: https://linkedin.com/in/jillian-wise-ph-d-95483166/
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Ainara Sistiaga and I am a molecular geoarchaeologist. I study the lipids (fats) that survive in ancient rocks and artifacts to better understand past climate and human history. I work as a researcher in the University of Copenhagen and MIT. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I always liked history and human evolution, the mysteries of our history were my passion as a kid, but also liked a lot nature and Earth history. In college I decided to study history, with a major in Prehistory. From my freshman year I joined a archaeological excavation on Neanderthals. There I discovered you can actually combine history and geology by studying the past climate through the analysis of archaeological sediments. In those sediments I discovered the presence of molecular markers of Neanderthal diet, and this finding actually defined my path towards the molecular study of archaeological sediments and feces. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I think there is always a part of your job that you don’t like, in my case is data analysis. I love field work and I really enjoy the lab work, but data analysis is quite boring. However, this eureka moment when you realise you have found something very cool is what makes me jump of the bed every morning. The creativity part of this job is what I really enjoy. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I love to swim and exercise, I think keeping a healthy life and mental health is essential to survive this academic environment. When things get complicated I breathe and go for a swim. Learn how to deal with rejection is very important in this field, when you get a manuscript rejected, a fellowship or a grant, it is quite devastating because there is a lot of work and hope invested in it, but sometimes better opportunities come after, it is not the end of the world even if it feels like it. Experiments often don’t work but we learn from that and do better next time. Being resilient is a big skill in Science. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I guess all the women that have been crucial at every step of my life are role models for me, especially my mother and grandmother. Professionally I really admire the work and strength of Lynn Margulis and Mary Leakey. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? I think I will advise myself to do not fret that much about the major of field I chose when I went to college. I did history and then liked organic chemistry and molecular biology so I decided to transition towards those fields. Everything you learn is enriching you and there is always time and opportunities to change fields. The change might not be easy but it is not impossible, just enjoy the journey. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Be curious, good colleague and don’t let anyone tell you what you can and cannot do. 8. How do you measure your success? I guess in academia we measure success with publications, but actually getting invitations to inspire young girls it feels pretty much like success :) 9. Where can we find out more about your work? If you google Ainara Sistiaga you can find some of the media coverage of my work and most of my published work can be found in google scholar or researchgate. 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? I am less active in social media than I would like to be, but I have a professional twitter account @AinaraSistiaga , and I am also in Linkedin, although I use it less than twitter.
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