What is a STEM gig?

What is a STEM gig?

gig

informal, noun gig; plural noun: gigs

A job, especially one that is temporary

"working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig"

"I need an awesome summer gig to get some real work experience!"

STEM gig

  • Internships 
  • Summer jobs
  • Work experience
  • Mentor programs 
  • Scholarships
  • Networking events
  • Awards, contests, competitions
  • What else? Any opportunity that encourages a young woman in STEM before her professional career begins...

 

 


 

Are you "geeky" girl? Studying math, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, social sciences, biology, etc?

Geeky Girl Reality is here to kickstart your career. If you majored in physics, maths, social sciences, chemistry, computer science or similar STEM subjects, we aim to have all the resources you need to start building your career. 

Still studying?

Currently enrolled in university and still learning about possible paths and careers?

Take part in the student survey » 

Gigs are all about balancing work and study - getting some real-world exposure to your field of study. 

Not yet ready for a full-time STEM job? You need a STEM gig, girl! 

We highlight short-term opportunities like summer programs, internships and mentor programs.

Through our Geeky Girl Reality research we found that young women are looking for short term opportunities to help them start out in STEM careers.

Search our STEM gigs to find the gig to kickstart your career!

- The Geeky Girl Reality team


Interested in joining our team? Send your CV and letter of interest to discuss@geekyreality.com

 


 

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

Quotes from our survey participants

In our annual Geeky Girl Reality survey we asked young women currently studying STEM about their in the field and where they might be in 10 years...

 

 

We hope to help them get there with our social mission to support "geeky" girls living their reality.

Take part in the student survey »

Take part in the professional survey »

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

 

Latest from the Geeky Girl Reality Blog

1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Dr. Justyna Hampel and I am a biogeochemist and microbial ecologist. I study cycling of nitrogen in lakes and estuaries and toxic algal blooms. For my PhD work I got to work on lakes in China, Florida, and Ohio. I grew up in Poland and came to the US for my undergrad and PhD. In May, I will be starting a postdoctoral research position in marine science studying microbial communities in the Gulf of Mexico. I am interested in looking at microbial communities and biodiversity in marine sediments and shipwrecks, and how these microbes interact with the natural and artificial environments. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I have always been interested in science however, growing up in Poland, I didn’t know that being a scientist was something I can actually do for a living. I went to college on a swimming scholarship, after being a competitive swimmer for 12 years, and I had very few ideas on what to do once my swimming career was over. It wasn’t until my senior year of undergrad when I started volunteering in an environmental chemistry lab and realized that research was something I really wanted to pursue. It is never too late! 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? My job is my passion, and I really love what I do. Being curious and the pursue of knowledge is what keeps me going every day! But, as with everything in life, there are better and worse days. What I love most about my job, is that it is very interdisciplinary. It includes lab work, field work and sampling, computer analysis, teaching, writing, and reading. When I feel tired of working in the lab, I can work on writing or computer analysis, and vice versa. The flexibility associated with my job keeps me productive and involved! 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? In times of stress it is crucial to have a good support system. For me, it is my family, my mentors, friends, partner, and colleagues at work who have been really amazing and able to raise my spirits when I’m down. Whether it’s a failed experiment, funding rejections, bad paper reviews, a supportive community is very important! And when someone else is going through stressful times, I try to “give back” and be the support system for that person. Other than being surrounded by awesome people, when I’m stressed, I like to step away from work and do something fun: go to the movies, go on a mini road trip, binge watch Netflix :) 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I have many role models! In science, it is my PhD advisor Dr. Silvia Newell and all the great, inspiring female scientists I got to work with throughout my journey. Being from Poland, I have to say that Marie Skladowska-Curie has been an inspiration to me since I was a little girl. She was a true Woman in STEM pioneer! I also admire Greta Thunberg; you are never too young to fight for the planet and our future. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? I would tell my younger self to be patient because all the hard work will pay off eventually! 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Do something that truly makes you happy and inspired. Don’t give up on your dreams. Don’t get discouraged when someone tells you that you can’t do something, or you are not good enough. Have a mentor who can help you get started and guide you through. This is important at any level of your education or career. 8. How do you measure your success? To me being successful is being able to apply my research to current environmental issues, contribute to solutions, and communicate science to the public. It is also important to celebrate all victories and achievements, no matter how small, and look at how much I have accomplished and how far I’ve come as a scientist. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? I have a website: aquaticmicrobes.com 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? I am on Twitter: @Just_AquaticN
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Ana Maria Porras and I am a biomedical engineer. I finished my Ph.D. in 2017 and I am now a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University. I spend my days studying the bacteria inside our guts and finding ways to understand how it is that they have the power to control our health. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I think I always knew I wanted to be a scientist or engineer. My parents were engineers and I enjoyed solving problems and making things, but I knew I didn't want to build bridges or cars. One day, my mom, who was a professor, came back from visiting another university, where she had heard for the first time about bioengineering. From there, I did some research and learned that biomedical engineers solve problems in human medicine and I fell in love with the field. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? The people I work with and knowing that I get to learn something new every day. Sometimes, it's even something nobody else in the world knows yet! 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? Two things: time off with family and friends, and dancing it out! Just two days ago I had a pretty busy and kind of rough day at work. I was stressing so much about several deadlines I have coming up. After work, I went to my dance rehearsal with 3 other friends and once we started dancing and laughing, all the worries of the day just went away. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? Dr. Kristyn Masters, who was my thesis advisor during my Ph.D. Kristyn taught me everything I know about being a good scientist, and more importantly, about being a good caring mentor. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? Talk to as many people as possible and learn as much as you can about all the possible careers out there! There's so much you can do, the sky is the limit. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Let your curiosity guide your path Don't let others tell you what you can or cannot do Find friends and mentors that can support you in the journey 8.  How do you measure your success? First against myself by thinking about how far I have come and how much I have learned at each stage of professional and personal career. Second, by evaluating the people and communities I have been able to interact with and hopefully contribute to in some way. 9.  Where can we find out more about your work? Follow me on social media (see below) to learn about microbiology and see the cute crocheted microbes I make! You can also visit  the lab website:  https://www.britolab. org/people 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? SO social! Find me on Twitter and Instagram @AnaMaPorras . If you speak Spanish, I'm also on Instagram and Facebook @anaerobias . And here is my LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ ana-maria-porras/
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? Uvlulluataq, I am Dr. Kat Napaaqtuk Milligan-Myhre. I am Inupiaq; a Microbiologist who dabbles in evolution, ecology, systems biology, and molecular biology; a runner; a mom to two kids; and a beadworker, not necessarily in that order. In my research, I use a fish found all over the northern hemisphere called threespine stickleback to study host-microbe interactions, and specifically how our genes influence how our gut microbes interact with our bodies. In other words, I’m interested in how the trillions of microbes in our gut help us grow, and how our gut microbes stop microbes that can cause disease from causing disease, and why that is different in one person vs another person. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I have had at least a dozen jobs, ranging from radio DJ to janitor to housekeeper for a fancy hotel, to now a scientist. I had at least a dozen ideas of what I was going to do when I grew up and scientist wasn’t one of them. I thought everything was known in science, so what was the point? When I was an undergraduate student at college I thought I wanted to be an MD doctor, so I worked in research labs to make my CV more appealing. While I was there I discovered that I REALLY liked research – new discoveries every day, working in groups on projects and also independently, coming up with ideas for where to take projects, watching microbes under the microscopes, etc. I was hooked. I’ve been in research for over 20 years, and I still love it. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I love talking to people who are passionate about learning new things, and I love coming up with ideas for learning new things. I have a lab with somewhere between 10-15 people, depending on the semester, and I love watching their scientific independence grow over the semester/year. I was also a bench scientist for almost 20 years, and recently moved into field work (collecting fish from the wild). When I am out in the field, I like to stop to watch my fish and think about how the microbes in their guts are affecting their development, behavior, and where they are getting the microbes from, and how the microbes are interacting with other microbes. So, long story short, there is a lot I love about my job. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I like to run. When I am out for a run, I see the world in a completely different way. It helps me clear my mind when I’m stuck, it makes me feel stronger, and I can see places I would never have been able to get to by just walking/driving. My scariest run was when I was trying to run at my parents camp on the Noatak river. I ran less than a half a mile down the river, smelled a bear, and ran back to camp as fast as I could! The most beautiful run would be hard to pick. I ran with a colleague in a remote part of France at daybreak. It was a great way to talk about our science, and the sunrise was beautiful. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I have a lot of role models. I was very lucky to work for two women who were supportive and examples of what women in science can accomplish – Laura Knoll and Karen Guillemin. I also look up to Jo Handlesman, microbiologist and scientific advisor to President Obama. I have been lucky to return to my home state with my degree, which has helped me figure out how to use my education for the benefit of my tribe. For that I look to the strong women who have lead Alaskan Native education, including Della Keats. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? For a long time I tried really hard to fit in to Western society. I didn’t go home very often, I believed scientists when they dismissed traditional medicine, and I tried to downplay my heritage. I would tell my younger self to embrace what makes me different, and use that to my advantage in my studies. I see things in a different way due to my upbringing, and that has helped me tremendously as a scientist. I wish I had seen that sooner. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Be true to yourself. Figure out what interests you and follow that passion. There are so many different exciting things to learn about in science! You don’t have restrict yourself to one field. I combine microbiology with physiology and ecology and evolution. It’s exciting to learn about so many different fields and how they fit together! There are SOOOO many people who want to help girls get into STEM. If you start with one mentor and it doesn’t work out for whatever reason, find another mentor who can help your passion for science grow. 8. How do you measure your success? For work: papers/funding/excitement in my mentees about science. For my family: time spent together, hugs, and honesty. For my tribe: research that helps us make decisions about our future (haven’t accomplished that yet). 9. Where can we find out more about your work? I am @napaaqtuk on Twitter, and my website is https://drkatlab.wordpress.com/about/ 
View all blog posts