What is a STEM gig?

What is a STEM gig?

gig

informal, noun gig; plural noun: gigs

A job, especially one that is temporary

"working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig"

"I need an awesome summer gig to get some real work experience!"

STEM gig

  • Internships 
  • Summer jobs
  • Work experience
  • Mentor programs 
  • Scholarships
  • Networking events
  • Awards, contests, competitions
  • What else? Any opportunity that encourages a young woman in STEM before her professional career begins...

 

 


 

Are you "geeky" girl? Studying math, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, social sciences, biology, etc?

Geeky Girl Reality is here to kickstart your career. If you majored in physics, maths, social sciences, chemistry, computer science or similar STEM subjects, we aim to have all the resources you need to start building your career. 

Still studying?

Currently enrolled in university and still learning about possible paths and careers?

Take part in the student survey » 

Gigs are all about balancing work and study - getting some real-world exposure to your field of study. 

Not yet ready for a full-time STEM job? You need a STEM gig, girl! 

We highlight short-term opportunities like summer programs, internships and mentor programs.

Through our Geeky Girl Reality research we found that young women are looking for short term opportunities to help them start out in STEM careers.

Search our STEM gigs to find the gig to kickstart your career!

- The Geeky Girl Reality team


Interested in joining our team? Send your CV and letter of interest to discuss@geekyreality.com

 


 

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

Quotes from our survey participants

In our annual Geeky Girl Reality survey we asked young women currently studying STEM about their in the field and where they might be in 10 years...

 

 

We hope to help them get there with our social mission to support "geeky" girls living their reality.

Take part in the student survey »

Take part in the professional survey »

Join our STEM community and access the resources »

 

Latest from the Geeky Girl Reality Blog

1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? Hi! I’m Katie Mummah, a nuclear engineering and graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I build and use computer models to study the lifecycle of uranium. I’m using these detailed computer models to help us predict and identify countries who are trying to build nuclear weapons while hiding that information from the world. I also consider myself a science communicator in my spare time. I share a lot of nuclear science and engineering through outreach events and on Twitter because nuclear science is a fun and diverse field! Most people don’t learn any nuclear science in school, so I think it’s really important to share the science as widely as I can. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I was always fascinated by complex things as a kid. Earth and space science excited me, and I still nurse a fascination with geology, atmospheric science, and astrophysics as interesting and deeply complex fields. But as I approached college, I started to care about clean energy, and I decided to become an engineer. I met some female nuclear engineers who told me that nuclear engineering was similar to mechanical engineering (much of the field is, though there are lots of parts that are closer to physics or chemical engineering) but all the class sizes were smaller (true) and that was a benefit if you go to a huge college with thousands of engineering students. I took my introductory nuclear classes in college and I fell in love. Never looked back! 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I’m a nuclear engineer because I really, deeply care about access to clean, abundant energy. I think everyone in the world deserves energy access, and I know that we can draw down our CO2 emissions by using all clean energy technologies like wind, solar, hydro, and nuclear energy. I want to help build that future. There is always more nuclear science to learn! Just in my day-to-day life as a nuclear engineer, I’ve had to learn physics, mechanical engineering, systems engineering, chemical engineering, materials science, computer science, geology, political science, communications, and more! Nuclear engineering is interdisciplinary at its core, and that’s just so exciting! 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I’m in the middle of graduate school, and it can be hard sometimes. Anyone that tells you otherwise is trying to minimize what is designed to be a huge challenge to help you grow. But I’ve learned that having hobbies is not only fun, but *essential* to keeping your stress levels low. When I’m stressed, I take a weekend to go camping or skiing and completely unplug from work and the fast pace of everyday life. I like to make little goals for my hobbies, which helps me feel successful. For example, I’m trying to visit every state park in Wisconsin and I’m learning to sail. No one should be required to have hobbies that are beneficial to their career, but you’d be surprised how much engineering relates to many hobbies! I use materials science knowledge when I blacksmith, and sailing is just applied fluid dynamics. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I don’t have one singular role model, but I have lots of people I consider mentors and/or role models. My advisor, several of my internship mentors, and a variety of (often female) academics, scientists, communicators, and more have given me inspiration and advice that I’ve used to help me chart my path forward. I do look up to some of the badass historical figures in nuclear science, like Chien-Shiung Wu and Maria Goeppert-Mayer. All women in STEM follow in their footsteps, and for that I’m forever grateful. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? I’d tell myself to stop worrying about following the “right” or “best” path forward. I spent so many years trying to be perfect for everyone else in my life before I realized that I should do what makes ME happy first and foremost. Also, actually learn to study and write effectively back in high school. They’re really important skills. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Don’t let others define your story. Join whatever clubs you want, take the classes you find interesting, and pursue a career that interests you. Take advice from the older generations (especially those in your field) but remember that everyone has blind spots. People are going to advise you to follow in their footsteps— that’s one path forward, but not the only one. Good mentors will help you find YOUR best path forward. Everyone else is struggling, too. STEM is hard, college is hard, your problem sets are hard. If you’re struggling, that doesn’t mean you’re failing, in fact it means you’re succeeding! Don’t get scared off by difficult classes, and don’t be afraid to work with your peers and go to office hours. Keep an open mind and always be learning. I can’t even tell you the number of times I said “no I’ll never do that” to something, only to eventually realize I totally loved that thing! I went into college thinking I was going to get my bachelors and leave, I wanted to work in a commercial nuclear plant and work with my hands. Six years later, I’m in grad school doing computational research at a university I didn’t even want to apply to for undergrad because I didn’t like weather (turns out I do actually like the cold). Don’t close doors for yourself. 8. How do you measure your success? I measure success by how much I’m learning. If I’ve learned something, done something new each day, then I’m making progress. I also ask others-- am I doing enough? Good mentors will help you when you’re struggling. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? You can find more info about me on my website, nuclearkatie.com. You can contact me from there, follow me on Twitter from there, or check out my resume if you want to see my conference presentations and (someday) journal articles. 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? I am social! Twitter: @nuclearkatie (https://twitter.com/nuclearkatie) LinkedIn: nuclearkatie (https://www.linkedin.com/in/nuclearkatie/) STEM Instagram: vintage_nuclear (https://www.instagram.com/vintage_nuclear/)
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Marjorie Abdelkrime, professionally my title is Chief of Staff, that means I lead all execution of vision and strategy for the organization I work for, the Solution Engineering Org at VMware. Personally I am an ally and advocate for equality and equity in the workplace. 2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? Chaos seems to be how I end up in every new point in my career. I call it good chaos though. It is important to look at every situation put in front of you and look at how it can be made to make things better for you. My current role Chief of Staff is a role that I bumped into as I looked to enter a company that I felt would be a good place for me personally and professionally. However as I looked at the role and what it could do, I felt it was a role that was created for me at this point in time in my life and career journey. The culmination of my work experiences as a professional services consultant and solution engineer has allowed for me to have a unique perspective in this role and to ensure that we take a point of view that helps improve our effectiveness as a team. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? My why: My Why is to inspire and uplift others to shatter boundaries so that they become impactful contributors of society. Secondly the people I am surrounded by, I will always say this, the people around you will make or break your ability to execute on a personal and professional level. 4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? I take a moment to look at where I came from and how far my journey has taken me. I come from an immigrant family that worked hard to ensure that my siblings and I had a roof over our heads and food on the table. I realize that those before me had it especially hard for me to be where I am today. That sets so much into perspective for me. I am blessed with good health a great career and amazing people that surround me from my family and friends to my coworkers. 5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I always struggle with this question the reason is my role models change from topic that I need to the time I am in my life. Lately I have found myself quoting a lot of Brenee Brown. She is a thought leader in the space of vulnerability and courage. Which at this point in my life I am doing a lot of. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? Always speak your mind. I have many instances that I have thought back to and regretted not saying something. I would say it is important that we feel that we are expressing ourselves without regret. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? Always have the confidence that you know what you are talking about if that is an area of expertise you have. Do not let others tell you what you know. Network, spend time meeting new people in the field you are looking to take your career into. If you are still in school, ask your parents to assist with this one. Ask, I was once told by a colleague of mine, “What’s the worst that can happen when you ask? someone will say no. But you will not know that if you don’t ask.” 8. How do you measure your success? Did I get the customer impact I was expecting? My role has an impact on the people I work with as well as the customers we engage. If the people I work with are unable to ensure that customers are solving their business problems because of initiatives that I have launched, then that means I have failed. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? If you are looking to find out more about the role of a Chief of Staff here is a neat little article that gives you the gist of what the role is about. The CoS role is one that varies from Company to Company but also even within a Company it can vary from org to org. https://medium.com/@juliadewahl/the-chief-of-staff-role-in-silicon-valley-182eb93e636e 10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? Yes!! I love connecting with new people! I share stories at times on LinkedIn and Twitter. Twitter: MarjAStem   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marjorieabdelkrime/
1. Introduce yourself, who are you what do you do? My name is Ileana Crudu, and I have always been a fan of STEAM. I am the ambassador of a project called GirlsGoIT, where we empower girls in and through technology.  2. How did you arrive at this career (or point in your life/work)? Was it always something you knew you wanted to do? I grew up in a post-soviet country. Back in early 2000, my older sister had a computer, which was extremely rare. I think we were the only family on the street that had a computer at that time. First thing I did to that computer was to disassemble it so I can see how that fan works. I loved to build and disassemble items. Girls my age had barbies and dolls; I had my toolbox. So, I guess I have always known I wanted to study and work in STEAM. 3. What about your job makes you jump out of bed in the morning, especially on those cold, dark mornings? I have always been a curious person. STEAM does not let allow to get bored. I try to wake up with a smile on my face every single morning. If that does not happen, there is coffee to solve the problem. My dream is to get to that point where girls are not a minority in this field, and STEAM education is accessible to every single kid. Until then, there is no time to rest. So I guess my biggest motivation is my goal of having equal representation, opportunity and pay for women in STEAM.  4. What is your personal cure for stress or how do you raise your spirits in times of doubt? Can you share a Story? Whenever I feel stressed, I take a break from work and do something that loses me up. Most of the time, I pun on my Queen playlist and go for a walk.  5. Who is your role model? If no one, any thoughts on this? I do not have a role model. I think it is quite dangerous to idolatrize someone. But I try to learn and get inspired by everyone I know. I learnt from my mom to be grateful, from my sister to fight for everything I want, from my college professors that there is more to life than just academia. 6. What advice would you give to yourself if you could go back in time? To stop stressing out over minor things. Take a long breath and start thinking about how you can solve a problem. If it seems complicated, think of the problem as a computer science assignment and divide the problem into smaller, simpler problems that are easy to solve. If things don't work out at all, go out and enjoy some coffee. There was no problem from the beginning. 7. Top 3 tips for girls starting out in STEM? The Holy Grail of success in any field is NETWORK! Meet people that have the same passions as you and people that are total opposites of you. They are a free source of inspiration. Another tip is to be perseverent. You might not get that internship that you wanted. It's okay. Apply to as many as you need until you get one. Last, do what you love and love what you do. Life is too short to spend it doing things that don't matter to you. 8. How do you measure your success? If the work I do makes a difference for a young woman, that is enough for me. If a girl chooses a career in STEAM after being in our program, I consider it a success. 9. Where can we find out more about your work? You can find everything about GirlsGoIT on our website, https://girlsgoit.org/. You can also check out some youtube videos about our STEM summer camp and testimonial from our girls. You can only check my twitter, @IleanaCrudu , for more information.  10. Are you social? Will you share your Twitter handle, or LinkedIn profile, or Facebook so that young women can connect with you? You can find me on Twitter and Instagram: @IleanaCrudu
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